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Tax Strategies

How will taxes impact your retirement? 

The most common retirement portfolios consist of:

IRAs

There are two types: Traditional and Roth. These are are considered tax-advantaged savings accounts to help you for retirement. They hold stocks, bonds, mutual funds, ETFs, and more. 

401(k)s

A 401(k) is a retirement savings plan sponsored by an employer. It has an "employee match" feature and taxes aren't paid until the money is withdrawn from the account.

Individual Brokerage Accounts

A brokerage account is a type of investment account you open with a brokerage firm, and you can use it to buy stocks, bonds, and other investments. 

SEP IRAs

This is another form of an IRA, which also allows business owners to provide retirement benefits for themselves and their employees. Funds can be invested the same way as most other IRAs.

Social Security 

Social security is another tool people take into consideration when creating their retirement portfolio or retirement plan. 

Pensions

A pension plan is a retirement plan that requires an employer to make contributions into a pool of funds set aside for a worker's future benefit, rather than it being employee funded.

Real Estate Holdings

Real estate investments is another common way to build a retirement portfolio and save for retirement.  

If this is your portfolio, perhaps a tax-diversified or tax-efficient retirement strategy is right for you.

Speak with an advisor

Use the tax code to your advantage

The retirement accounts above, could be subject to ordinary income tax, and/or capital gains tax.

The majority of these retirement assets could subject the retiree to IRS means testing, which could even lead to Social Security being taxed as ordinary income.

Please consult a Fitzpatrick advisor about building the ideal portfolio that attempts to use the tax code to your advantage. We strive to retire clients in as close to the zero tax bracket as possible by tax diversifying their portfolio with favorable, tax favored assets and investments.

Learn more

Related content

IRA Withdrawals that Escape the 10% Tax Penalty

The list of IRA withdrawals that may be taken without incurring a 10% early penalty has grown.

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